Choosing the Right Dog Breed for You and Your Family

Choosing the Right Dog Breed for You and Your Family

Choosing the Right Dog Breed for You and Your Family

A dog can be one of the best and most loyal companions you will ever have. If you have been considering getting a dog, it is extremely important that you research different dogs to help you in selecting the right breed for you and your family. Temperament, activity level, longevity, maintenance, and cost of upkeep are all important factors to consider when deciding on a new companion. Here are some basic considerations to help get you started on your search.

Temperament: The general temperament of a breed is very important to consider, particularly if you have children. If you plan on children playing with the dog, an aggressive or high strung breed may not be the best choice. If the new pal is mainly for protection, docile breeds are probably not for you. Consider the breed’s history, general reputation, and energy level.

Activity level: Where you live and where you plan on keeping the dog are also important to think about. A herding or working breed will need lots of room to run and play. If the dog is to be kept indoors, consider the size of your home versus the size of the breed. Some dogs make great apartment dwellers while others definitely do not.

Longevity: Keep in mind that as a general rule, small breeds live longer than large breeds. Some larger breeds have average life spans of less than ten years, while some toy breeds may live to as old as twenty.

Maintenance and upkeep: Keep in mind that your dog will cost you money beyond his initial purchase price. Food, grooming, bathing, regular and unexpected vet bills, flea and tick prevention, heartworm prevention, toys like cotton plush dog toys and other accessories are all ongoing costs that can vary from breed to breed. Some breeds must be groomed regularly by a professional, while others need little or no grooming at all. Long haired breeds and dogs that spend time outdoors will need brushing much more often than those with short hair. Some dogs do an excellent job of keeping themselves clean and do not need bathing often, while others will need much more frequent baths. Large breeds will, of course, eat a great deal more than smaller dogs.

Regardless of what breed you choose, your new friend will be a loving and loyal companion for many years to come. Reliable information and in depth details on different breeds can be obtained from any responsible breeder or dog club such as the AKC. Research your options and choose wisely, so that you can have the happiest and most well-adjusted dog possible.

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Older Dog Potty Training

Older Dog Potty Training

Older Dog Potty Training

People tend to think that older dog potty training is impossible. This is not true. In fact, you will use the same methods no matter what the age of your dog, but older dogs will take a little more time. This is because they have learned other behaviors. With puppies, you start with a blank canvas. With older dogs, you have to erase and redraw the picture.

One good thing about older dog potty training is that older dogs have developed more bladder control. Therefore, you do not have to take him out as often as you would a puppy. One very effective way to train is to use a crate. A crate is meant for training only, not to be used as a place to keep your dog for long periods of time.

Dogs have a natural instinct to not soil the area in which they will be sleeping and resting. Therefore, it is unlikely that your dog will eliminate in the crate. If he does, he may have been left in there too long. Each time you take your dog out of the crate, put him on a leash and take him outside or to any other designated toilet area. If he does not eliminate after a few minutes, put him back in the crate and try again later. Use the crate only for training.

Simple Older Dog Potty Training

Whenever your dog eliminates in the correct place, praise and reward him. This is huge in older dog potty training. You want them to really get how proud you are that they have done the right thing. When you are out for a walk and your dog eliminates, give him a treat. If you wait until you are back inside, you have waited too long. Your dog will not connect the treat with elimination unless you provide it immediately.…

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Dog Potty Training Tips

Dog Potty Training Tips

Dog Potty Training Tips

People are always looking for dog potty training tips that will speed along the housebreaking process. One of the biggest tips I can offer is to be consistent with your training. If you see that your dog is starting to eliminate where she should not and you don’t do anything about it because you are tired, you will confuse your dog. If you normally pick your dog up immediately and bring her outside (which is what you should do), then you need to do this every time until she is fully trained.

Another huge tip is on the topic of praise and scolding. Keep scolding to a bare minimum. You may say a quick, deep, “No,” when your dog starts to eliminate in the wrong place, but stop there. Any hitting or rubbing your dog’s nose in the spot will only intimidate your dog. Your dog may then become frightened of you or aggressive toward you, and your whole training process is now about regaining trust. You can also find great dog potty training tips by asking your vet.

Quick Dog Potty Training Tips

Make sure you feed your dog on a set schedule. This way, your dog will develop an elimination schedule as well. Take your dog out at those times. Always praise your dog for doing the right thing. You may give rewards as well if you like, but make sure you give them right away or your dog may not associate the treat with being good.

Never leave food and water available for your puppy all day. If the climate calls for your dog to be more hydrated than usual, then put out water. Just know that the more you feed your dog, the more he will have to eliminate. If you give him all-access to food, then a schedule will never be set. All dog potty training tips will also tell you to never allow your puppy to eliminate anywhere other than his toilet area.…

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Games to Play with Your Dog in Winter

Games to Play with Your Dog in Winter

Games to Play with Your Dog in Winter

While your dog loves playing outside when it is winter time you probably cannot think of a great game to play outside with your dog. I know that with my dogs they absolutely love to run in the snow non-stop and chase each other. However, even that can get old for them after a few minutes and they do tire out because instead of pushing off on the ground they have to push themselves up and out of the snow first. So here are some simple games that you can play with your dog outside in the winter time.

The first game that you can play is if there is snow on the ground with your dog is fetch. Now this is very similar to the ones that you play in the summer time except instead of using the brightly colored tennis ball or other rubber dog toys that you have them fetch you will be using a snow ball. Now granted they will not be bringing you back anything, but I know that my dogs find it very enjoyable. I will warn you though that if the snow has ice in it you will want to be extra cautious because the ice could end up hurting your dog.

The second game that you can play is hide and seek. Now in the snow it can be a lot harder to hide so you have to be a little bit more ingenious on how you’re hiding. Remember though that if you are going to have your dog off of his leash in your yard and play hide and seek with him then you will want to make sure that he is trained properly to ensure that he will not run off on you while you’re hiding.

The third game that you can play with your dog in winter is involving your kids. I know that my dogs love chasing after my kids in the yard and playing with them. So if your dog is one of those you can have your kids run around in the yard, works great on getting them tired to, and let your dog chase after them. I know that this game is fun and works wonders on wearing out your kids and dogs at the same time.

Playing games with your dog outside is fun and nice thing to do. I know if your dogs are like mine they will love the games that I talked about above, but even if they are not most dogs love playing in the snow just like little kids do.

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Dog Flea Control

Dog flea control involves some of the products that can be used on other animals, but also some that are specifically formulated for canines. Most products can be used for all animals susceptible to fleas. Cythioate, known by the brand name Proban, is only registered for use on dogs.

It is an organophosphate that absorbs into the dog’s bloodstream and causes its blood to become toxic to fleas that feed on it. It is available in tablet or liquid suspension and must be re-administered over several weeks in order to break the life cycle of the fleas.

 

Dog Flea Control and Prevention

Another product used on dogs for flea control is fenthion, also known as Pro-Spot. It kills fleas on contact and also has a residual effect on future infestations. It should be used in conjunction with a flea control program involving spraying and dusting the dog’s environment.

Many products kills eggs and larvae on the dog and in carpets, furniture and bedding. Prevention of flea infestation is, of course, the ideal. One way that flea control for dogs can be achieved is through good sanitation. This means keeping lawns and weeds trimmed to discourage fleas from laying eggs. Seal the house against rodents and small animals that may carry fleas into the home. Vacuum frequently and keep pet bedding clean.

Your dog can be released from the irritation of fleas and the potentially dangerous consequences of being their host. Knowing what type of dog flea control will prevent them, as well as what products can successfully treat fleas, can make your dog and family more comfortable.…

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All Dogs Go to Heaven Blu-Ray Review

All Dogs Go to Heaven Blu-Ray Review

All Dogs Go to Heaven Blu-Ray Review

Twentieth Century Fox Home Video’s All Dogs Go to Heaven Blu-Ray is a disappointing release of a highly underrated Don Bluth film. 3.5/5.

Like his debut The Secret of NIMH, Don Bluth’s All Dogs Go to Heaven got little respect when it hit theatres in 1989. It didn’t help that the former Disney animator’s flick was overshadowed by The Little Mermaid, the movie that re-established the Mouse House as a force in animation during the early 1990s.

That said, All Dogs Go to Heaven hit big on home video, becoming one of the best-selling VHS releases of all time, which makes it highly surprising that Twentieth Century Fox Home Video gave this cult classic such a cheap-ass release on Blu-Ray.

Twentieth Century Fox Home Video Presents Don Bluth’s All Dogs Go to Heaven on Blu-Ray

 

Set in 1939 New Orleans, smooth-talking confidence hound Charlie B. Barkin (Burt Reynolds) breaks out of the dog pound, accompanied by his sidekick Itchy Itchiford (Dom Deluise). Returning to the casino, he runs with his partner Carface (Vic Tayback), Charlie finds out the hard way that Carface wants to sever their partnership. Permanently.

Charlie finds himself in Heaven, despite the fact that he’s never done a good deed in his life. However, he restarts his life by stealing his “life watch” and returns to Earth in order to get revenge. He does this by stealing Carface’s secret weapon: an adorable orphan named Anne-Marie (Judith Barsi) who can talk to animals. Will Anne-Marie teach Charlie how to love and find redemption? Ya think?

Storywise, this film is highly predictable, and most kids will be able to call the twists before they happen. This movie was deemed too intense for younger children back in the day. It’s not as bad as its reputation, but parents should definitely scope out a few scenes (such as a hellhound menacing Charlie in a dream sequence) before showing this flick to the wee ones.

Visually, All Dogs Go to Heaven was no masterpiece. Disney Animation had caught up with Bluth, and it didn’t help that he was dealing with a much smaller budget ($13 million). That said, the animation is in line with the era and demonstrates Bluth’s proven ability to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear. Where Bluth really innovated was in his character design. While most animation of the era was highly regimented, Bluth stretched the boundaries of caricature, especially in using Reynolds’ well-known mannerisms to influence Charlie’s character.

A big plus with this film is how Burt Reynolds and Dom Deluise play off each other. Like John Goodman and Billy Crystal in Pixar’s Monsters Inc., Reynolds and Deluise recorded their voice tracks together, instead of the traditional method that has them record their tracks separately. Their ad-libs and hilarious riffing make one wonder why other studios don’t make their voice talent record together.

All Dogs Go to Heaven Blu-Ray Extras

Ordinarily, if I see zero special features in a home video release, I make fun of it by adapting a quote from The Princess Bride or Star Wars. However, Fox Home Video deserves a new one for not adding any special features to this release.

It would be understandable if All Dogs Go to Heaven was a complete bomb. But this film was a massive cult classic (did I mention one of the top VHS releases of all time?), which means there’s a huge built-in audience. Compare this to Disney’s release of another film that only found its audience on home video: Henry Selick’s The Nightmare Before Christmas. The Mouse House piled on the extras for that DVD release, knowing that fans of the film wanted them.

Why couldn’t Fox give a proven title like All Dogs Go to Heaven the same respect?

Twentieth Century Fox Home Video’s All Dogs Go to Heaven a Wonderful Film But Zero Extras

Is All Dogs Go to Heaven a classic? No, but it is a very good animated film and deserves a place on your shelf if you’re an animation fan. However, serious boo-urns to Fox Home Video for not giving this title, and its considerable audience, any respect.

For that reason alone, the All Dogs Go to Heaven Blu-Ray gets downgraded to a 3.5/5.

Interesting fact: The song “Love Survives” was dedicated to actress Judith Barsi, who was murdered by her father a year and a half before the movie came out.…

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Bulldog Ear Mite Care

Bulldog Ear Mite Care

Bulldog Ear Mite Care

Bulldog ear mite care can be a difficult process. If ear mites have traveled too far down the ear canal, the only treatment option may be a visit to the local veterinarian. If a serious ear mite problem exists, the infestation can lead to ruptured eardrums if not properly treated.

Bulldog ear mite care is particularly important in multiple-pet households. Ear mites can pass from one animal to another, making it imperative to act at the first sign of ear mites. One should not only be on the lookout for these parasites, but also act proactively to keep them out of the home.

Bulldog Ear Mite Care: Preventative Measures

In order to prevent ear mite multiplication, one should check a bulldog’s ears often in order to make sure that no ear mites are present. Ear mites, are, unfortunately, difficult to spot with the naked eye, as they are so small. Ear cleaning should therefore be made a regular part of bulldog ear mite care.

There are a number of different ear cleansers that can be used for this purpose. Many of these products can be found on the Internet. Make sure to look for a reputable site, one that seems as committed to your bulldog’s health as you are. Some sites also provide pages that deal with how best to conquer the ear mite problem.…

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Red Dog Leads Nominations for InsideFilm Awards

Red Dog Leads Nominations for InsideFilm Awards

Red Dog Leads Nominations for InsideFilm Awards

The internet -based InsideFilm Awards shortlists a diverse collection of films for their annual awards.

The IF Awards are, arguably, the second most important film awards dished out in Australia after the (newly named) Australian Academy Awards (AAFs). Voted for by internet throughout the year, the IFs are seen by many as truly democratic and selected by the audience that actually see the films in the cinemas. Detractors argue that such voting is open to abuse.

The nominations for 2011 proved to be diverse in the extreme as commercial success Red Dog dominated with nine followed by Oranges and Sunshine with eight and the very limited released Face to Face scoring six nominations.

2011 – the year in film

It has proven to be a year of mixed fortunes for Australian film. Red Dog has confounded all expectations and romped to more than $A20 million at the box-office – only the eighth local production to pass the benchmark. Its success will put it in good stead with the IF Awards, although its populist genre may be against it when the inaugural Australian Academy Awards (awards formerly known as the AFIs) are announced later in the year.

 

Nine nominations in ten categories could see the Kriv Stenders directed feature sweep the board. And it’s certainly hot favourite for best film, cinematography, music and editing.

One category that will certainly be awarded to a different film is that of best sound. Animation hit The Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole should pick up this gong, but Oranges and Sunshine and Snowtown are hoping to nab it for themselves.

It will be difficult to bet against the ensemble nominations for best actor and best actress. The entire cast of the arthouse hit Face to Face has been nominated for best actor or best actress as a single nomination per category. Vince Colosimo, Sigrid Thornton, Luke Ford, Mathew Newton…. With several actors or actresses making up a single nomination – essentially making it an ensemble nomination – acclaimed performances by Emily Watson (Oranges and Sunshine) and Geoffrey Rush (The Eye of the Storm) may just have to wait until the AAFs for recognition.

With its six nominations, Face to Face could give Red Dog something of a run for its money, particularly if it can add best script to the acting awards. Red Dog has won acclaim for a story well-told more than award recognition for its acting, script or direction. Cinematography and music, along with that well-told storyline, are the film’s strengths.

It’ll be the AAFs that are likely to look to films such as The Eye of the Needle, the overlooked The Hunter starring Willem Dafoe, Oranges and Sunshine and (personal favourite) Snowtown. No supporting actor/actress category in the IFs has meant there is no room for the likes of Lucas Pittaway (Snowtown) and the young Morgana Davies (The Hunter).

Previous Awards

First established in 1999, the IF Awards have undergone a number of names according to its sponsor (the Jameson IF Awards being the current name) and, with its on-line polls, have frequently bucked the trend as far as awards are concerned.

Jacki Weaver may have received a National Board of Review award along with an Oscar nomination for her performance in Animal Kingdom last year, but the veteran actress missed out at the IF Awards. That particular category was won by the young Caitlin Stasey for her role in Australia’s most commercially successful film of the year, Tomorrow When the War Began.

The Black Balloon was the most awarded Australian film of 2008, but the IF Awards chose Men’s Group, a film almost exclusively restricted to festival screenings, as its best film.

Not disimilar in style to Men’s Group, the feature Face to Face could well cause a few surprises come awards night.…

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Review–Dog Language: An Encyclopedia of Canine Language

Review--Dog Language: An Encyclopedia of Canine Language

Review--Dog Language: An Encyclopedia of Canine Language

Dog Language: An Encyclopedia of Canine Behavior by Dr. Roger Abrantes is exactly what the title states; an encyclopedia of canine behavior. Here at last is a text that explicitly defines, describes and illustrates canine behavior as it applies to communication. Much of the confusion and insecurity that is experienced by canine and human in the opening days of their life together is eased after reading this book.

Taking a Closer Look:

 

Within the first 34 pages Dr. Abrantes provides the reader with general definitions from the scientific field of Ethology. He gives the reader just enough information to understand that when attempting to communicate with a species that primarily uses body language instead of audible signals as the primary form of communication, then visual acuity becomes the preeminent tool. From Abnormal Behavior to Zoology, Dr. Abrantes provides the reader with alphabetically arranged concise definitions and detailed illustrations. This reader friendly format helps both new dog owners and experienced experts to identify specific observed behavior and predict other behaviors. Although the definitions are models in brevity, the illustrations are very detailed and deliver understanding at a glance. Even as the reader works his way through the text he is beginning to practice focused observation. By studying the details of each illustration, he trains himself to look for those mannerisms in his dogs. In time the reader begins to see similar mannerisms in other dogs and the information begins to gel. How the reader uses this format and pursues the study is totally self-directed. This allows the uniqueness of each personal learning style to lock-in the information. It also allows the uniqueness of the canine/human relationship to thrive.

Recommendation: YES

Never forgetting for a moment that all dogs are individuals and have their own unique ways of behaving and responding to the world at large, Dog Language: An encyclopedia of Canine Behavior is an excellent resource for general observed characteristics. More importantly, while using this text the reader becomes actively involved in the process of communicating. As he gains experience in his interpretations, the excitement builds and the hunger for more dialogue increases. Ultimately this results in a richer experience for human and canine.

Dr. Abrantes provides an added benefit with a bibliography that reads like the Who’s Who in the field of animal behavior. By studying some of the texts and articles referenced, the reader will be able to provide himself with a high level of understanding and knowledge.…

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Dog Shampoos

Dog Shampoos

Dog Shampoos

Dog shampoos are an important part of caring for your pet. Besides dealing with that luscious garbage he just rolled in, dog shampoos moisturize your dog’s skin and coat, soothe itching, and protect against fleas and ticks. And when you don’t have time to give your pal a full bath, there are a variety of wipes and waterless shampoos for a quick touchup, and colognes to cover up D.O.

 

Dog Shampoos Help Fight the Itch

Medicated dog shampoos contain insecticides to fight against ticks and fleas. It’s important, especially with long-haired breeds, to work the lather thoroughly into the coat, being sure it reaches the skin. It’s also important to rinse well, especially if your dog has a tendency to lick. Check the label carefully to be sure you’re choosing a product appropriate for your dog’s age and size.

Many shampoos also contain colloidal oatmeal to soothe the itching that results from flea bites, allergies, rashes or other kinds of canine dermatitis. Wipes, mitts, foams and sprays, when combined with a good brushing, can extend the time between baths. There are also wipes that reduce the amount of loose dander on your dog’s coat, which can greatly reduce symptoms in allergy sufferers and detangler sprays for that cocker spaniel’s knotty ears.

Did you know there are also “brightening” shampoos for white dogs and “color enhancing” shampoos for brown and black-haired dogs? And almost all dog shampoos contain emollients and conditioners to detangle your dog’s hair and make it shine. A nicely groomed dog is a beautiful sight. Just try to keep him out of that yummy garbage for an hour or two.…

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